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Nov. 8, 2022

+1Be5 w/Tayler Erbach

+1Be5 w/Tayler Erbach

#52. Season two continues with a guest I've known for years. He's gone from my coaching adversary to trusted assistant, and most importantly, a great friend. His name is Tayler Erbach, a former high school teacher who is now coaching adults on the importance of physical fitness as Director of Operations at Manduu. In this episode, we're going to discuss Manduu's unique footprint in the physical fitness industry, the difference between motivating teenagers vs. adults, and why he believes regardless of the industry, people, service and happiness make the difference.

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Transcript

Luke:

This is episode 52 of The "I" in Win podcast.

Tayler:

Our motto of kind of being five and, and not forgetting that the little things really become the most important things when they stack up on top of each other.

Luke:

Welcome back to The "I" in Win Podcast. Season two continues with the guests I've known for years. He's gone from my coaching adversary to trusted assistant, and most importantly, a great friend. His name is Taylor Erbach, a former high school teacher who is now coaching adults on the importance of physical fitness as a director of operations at Mandu. In this episode, we're going to discuss man do's unique footprint in the physical fitness industry. The difference between motivating teenagers, first adults, and why he believes regardless of the industry, people, service and happiness make the difference. Taylor, thanks for hopping on with us today.

Tayler:

Hey, it's a pleasure, Pleasure to be here. I've been listening and watching along as you've gone through this "I. Excited to chat with you here.

Luke:

So let's start with Mandu. As "I mentioned, it has a pretty unique footprint as it's a personal fitness boutique, and it has a definitely, definitely unique style and approach to physical fitness. So talk a little bit about that.

Tayler:

Yeah. So Mandu is a, a really unique, uh, form of fitness here in the United States. We're still fairly new to the us. it's a 15 minute electrical muscle stimulation workout that's equivalent to about six to eight hours inside of a conventional gym setting. Uh, the concept of EMS fitness started in Europe in the early to mid nineties. Uh, we've then taken their, their version of the concept, brought it here to the United States, um, and have begun franchising it out of our corporate office in Nashville, Tennessee. we now own and operate three studios here in Chicagoland and 16 studios nationwide.

Luke:

Let's talk about that transition from teaching coaching teenagers at the high school level to now helping adults achieve their personal goals. What was kind of the why behind that move?

Tayler:

Yeah, so "I spent the, the first nine years of my career, teaching pe from all ages. I've spent time in elementary school schools teaching kindergartners up to, uh, High schools teaching 17 and 18 year olds. I've spent most of my pe life inside of a weight room or inside of a health classroom, really helping, you know, young athletes develop their physical fitness. Um, the change came about for me and, and looking at, you know, the, the, the bigger picture of fitness and "I "I can have an effect on 16, 17, 18 year olds, but when they leave the PE setting, and especially when they leave the high school setting, And, and oftentimes, you know, you look at some of the, the epidemic that's going on in, in the United States and obesity being a big one, I felt that "I had a larger value in this world to really help adults with, with fitness issues and fitness problems. And, um, you know, the concept of VMs kind of came onto my plate very, uh, or outta kind of outta nowhere. You know, "I was playing, playing golf with my father-in-law. We ran into a woman out in front of us who was absolutely in phenomenal shape. Later we come to find out that she was in her mid seventies when, when we asked her about what she does for her, you know, daily fitness routine. She, you know, we, we assumed that she's gotta workout all day every day. She laughed at us and said, "I, you know, "I work out 15 minutes twice a week. I'm from Nashville, "I, "I, do this thing called Mandu. my father-in-law and "I went down, checked it out, and, and "I. Lifted all through high school, played college football. "I, mean "I. Know what it was like to be in a weight room at five in the morning and grinding things out and doing all those things. But I've never been as sore in my entire life as "I was after a 15 minute body weight movement hooked up to electrical muscle stimulation. Uh, so that was kind of the hook for me into the EMS world after already kind of considering the fact that "I wanted to change. Helping young athletes to instead helping adults live, you know, their lifelong fitness dream.

Luke:

And what about this dedication to physical fitness overall? Why do you think it's so important and why are so many people, especially adults, as you referenced, just missing the mark?

Tayler:

in my opinion, it's the easiest thing to forget about. It's the easiest thing to push aside. Um, it's the easiest thing to go through a really busy, long workday and say, You know what? "I, "I don't have "I, don't have the time to get to the gym. And, and in reality, it becomes, "I don't want to go to the gym. That was just something that "I had on my plate. If "I didn't get to it, "I didn't get to it. you know, my team, the staff that we have now at Mandu, the goal is to really help people understand that fitness is important. Fitness is lifelong. Fitness is your ability to buy time. The the fitter you can remain for a longer period of time. We're gonna push all these things aside and, you know, there's, there's enough scary things in this world. Your own personal health shouldn't be one of the things that you're really worried about. You gotta, you gotta find a way to make a little bit of time for yourself. And that was also one of the pieces with Mandu that really hooked me in is that, you know, 15 minutes, two, three times a week, you know, people complain about not having time to get to the gym, not having time to do this. With our particular concept, we're able. Almost cheat code or fast track that and give you six hours of resistance training in a simple 15 minute workout. but to be honest, "I mean that's what "I, that's what "I found and looking at some of these things is it's, it's, it's the easiest thing to push to the side. Uh, my kids have sports. Oh, "I have to run kids around here and there after school and after work today, uh, "I don't really want to get up at 5:00 AM to go to the. Before "I have to start my workday. It's one of those things, "I think that, you know, subconscious "I mean even, even "I, I've now partake in 15 minute workouts at a time. And there's days where "I go, you know, "I man, do "I really need to get that 15 minutes in? Well, you don't have to, but then you run the risk of everything else that comes along with it. And "I and "I think it, It's important that we continue to, to better ourselves. And you know, as you become a more fit individual and fitness becomes kind of at the, for. It also instills confidence and work ethic and the ability to go ahead and get things done and kind of "I mean. Luke, you've seen it and, and in your coaching time and, and the times that we've coached together and against each other, the kids that are willing to put in that time together in the weight room, they're not only working on their physical fitness, but they're also forming the ability to, to have a little bit of that extra grit, to have a little bit of that extra push through, the confidence to get the, get the things done in their day that they need to get done. "I think that the world of fitness can help provide that for a lot of people.

Luke:

so "I have the million dollar question for you. All right. And if you come up with a great answer, listeners, make sure you get your pens ready cuz we could tell this. If Taylor hits the home run. How do you motivate the unmotivated?

Tayler:

LifeLock question, right? As a coach, as a PE teacher, as a, as a educator across the board, how do you motivate the unmotivated, Uh, honest opinion. People are gonna be as motivated as they wanna be. Uh, "I think that intrinsic motivation is the most powerful thing in the entire world. Now, how do you overcome that as a coach, as a teacher, as a, um, personal trainer in the adult fitness world? "I think the most important piece there is to show the results that could be obtained. I think as, as we, oftentimes we forget to, especially with high school kids. And "I did this a ton when "I was in the weight room. Hey, this is the program. "I need you to complete this. It's gonna make us better as a team. Well, why? And oftentimes, we forget to answer that question, why, Especially as educators, and even more so now that I'm dealing with adults in the fitness world, well, why would "I do it this way? Why man, do, why is this the best option for me? So now it really has become more of my job, my staff's job, my trainer's jobs, to be able to sell not only this idea of EMS fitness, but the idea of Mandu we have the unique perspective inside of a Mandu studio. "I have a device that's called an in body seven 70. In Body seven 70 is a full body comprehensive scan that can show you, hey, on day one you had this amount of muscle mass, this amount of body fat mass, this is your percentage body fat. when we use very goal specific oriented inform. It allows us to kind of show what is the light at the end of the tunnel? What does that look like for one of our clients? Um, back to answer your, your real initial question of how do, how do you motivate the unmotivated, I think it's by just creating that next small goal. What does that next small goal, putting that carrot out in front, you know, if it's a client that's been struggling with weight, show them that. Point two. Weight loss is still a 0.2. Weight loss, you know, 0.2 pounds doesn't seem like a lot in the big scheme of things, but now the train's on the tracks, now it's moving forward. Now 0.2 turns into four, turns into six, turns into 0.8, and all of a sudden we have something moving in the right direction. we struggle with this and our company now, now, "I, deal with adults, right? Everybody wants, We live in a world where we want everything to happen right now. We often, one of the things, my managers and my manager in our Libertyville location, she's phenomenal. One of the things I've heard her continuously tell people is, Hey, you didn't get to where you were overnight. So the fact is, you're not gonna also reverse where you're at overnight. and that kind of goes back to the idea of getting that, getting that train moving on the tracks. We're gonna slowly chip away, Here's your goals. We're gonna slowly chip away. And through that, through that "I think that we begin to see. What started as a significant extrinsic motivation and someone having to push somebody to get to where they wanted to be. It becomes a little bit more internalized for our, for our clients, at least in my industry now, where they see, Hey, I've done this, I've done the work. Now let's see how "I can get another 0.2 off. it truly, it makes, it makes our job a lot easier once we kind of can get to that point. And now clients are kind of hooked, they're motivated, they're moving themselves down that train track rather than us being the locomotor that's push.

Luke:

So a couple things that you referenced in that answer, which, Thank you, "I. Loved it. Was the idea of showing the results of what can be attained. And that is something that could resonate with a lot of our listeners who are mostly coaches, teachers, definitely all in some type of leadership role. We have to create a vision. I mean you're, you're selling a vision to people and you have to get them to buy into that vision, whatever it may be. How often do you have to put those results? Of what can be the vision of what can be in front of people to keep them motivated and hopefully continue to tap into what intrinsically gets them going.

Tayler:

Man every day. Every day, every chance that you get, you need to be showing where things can go to, uh, whether you're, whether you're leading a, a team of trainers, which I'm doing now, um, or you're, you know, leading a, a, a high school girls basketball team every day. You need to show them where we can go, How do we get here and where can we continue to go? "I Think the more you can instill the idea of this is the goal, this is where we want to go. And "I think a big part of that. Whose goal is it? Was it in my particular case, the client's goal or in the coaching world? Was it the team's goal, in a classroom setting? Was it the student's goal? Or us as leaders, did we write the goal and tell them what the goal needed to be? "I think that plays a really large part in how. Students or athletes, or in my case, clients are going to see that goal if they're coming up with their own goals and "I and "I. And I've heard other people on your podcast talk about the idea of, you know, goal setting and, and things like that. And "I think it's extremely important in a team setting. You know, what goals do we have? If, if, if you have a team, if you have a, you know, a team that hasn't, hasn't really gone, the distance hasn't gone very far, you know, maybe it's not as big of a goal as a, as a brand new, really ambitious coach might have in saying, Hey, "I, we're And football. Let's say in the past we've been a two and seven football team, our goal is to make the playoffs well, is that a realistic goal that the team can get behind or is the goal in that first year to say, Hey, we won two last year. What about three? What about four? What about five? So actually setting attainable goals. Um, and, and we do this all the time in, in the fitness world, right? So client has a goal. Hey, "I wanna lose 145 pounds? Well, that's a pretty aggressive goal. What's the timeline? Two months. Uh, you know, we could sit back on this side of the desk and say, Hey, you're in the wrong place. Uh, here's a, here's a card, "I. I'd love to refer you to somebody else that will tell you that they're gonna get you there. We try to

Luke:

it's like, it's like that, uh, the high school freshman that walks in and wants to bench three 15, they give it two months. And why am "I not benching? Three 15, Right?

Tayler:

right? Yeah. So "I long term goals are great too. It's, it's important to be motivated by something and, and that freshman could get to three 15, but it ain't happening in two months. Um, so "I think, "I think that becomes a big part of that motivating factor is who's setting the goals. And I've tried this a lot of different ways. In some of the teams that I've coached, the most successful teams that I've coached have been the teams that have been able to communicate on the ground floor really well. probably "I "I know all of my career coaching, you know, football, basketball, golf track. Uh, I had a, a JV girls basketball team, at Brown Lake High School who we, you know, we were anticipated to win a game maybe. and due to the, the girls really being, Communicative with each other. They came together as a team. They set their own goals. "I just kind of helped steer where they wanted to go with things. and that was a team that ended up overachieving. but in reality, you can walk into one of my fitness studios and "I can tell you, Hey, your goal should be to gain you, We should put 12 pounds of muscle on you, Luke Mertons. And you know, if, if you look back at me and say, Oh, you know, "I, I'm good with where I'm at muscle wise. I'd like to see a couple pounds of fat come off. Well, if "I keep pushing my goal on you, you know, that's not gonna be something that's gonna motivate you. so "I "I think it's real important that we match the goal of the, the clients, the students, the teacher or the students. The athletes to actually the desired outcome. And "I think then we develop this better motivational plan than just forcing a goal upon.

Luke:

The other thing you talked about was celebrating, use the example of weight loss, someone who lost two, and hey, that that's a big deal, and keep that in front of the person. And that's celebrating the little victor. Something that "I struggle with myself, "I, "I get too caught up in the big vision and sometimes lose sight of these little victories that come along the way. So help me out. It's something "I have to get better at. What can we do to celebrate the little victories as both leaders and also as athletes or really anyone like in the personal fitness business?

Tayler:

Yeah, so across the board and "I "I know we're, we're gonna, we're gonna get to this, but I'm gonna dive out in front of you here a little bit. Um, that goes back to kind of my second part of our, our motto. My motto and what I'm doing now. And, and it. It says B five. Uh, you "I can't remember exactly the name of, of who you had on that was talking about this, this poem of everything you, everything you needed to learn, you learn when you were in kindergarten. that has been a big part of my life. B five, uh, or at least, at least now in my life, it has "I will say something. "I came across here. Post educational world for myself. but if you think back to the idea of being a five year old, you know, a five year old celebrates everything. They celebrate everything, you know, they got off the bus, well, you know, they, they, uh, tied their shoes for the first time. They learned how to ride a bike. Think about all these small things that happen along the way that are so celebratory to a five year old, that that has now become part. Our motto of kind of being five and, and not forgetting that the little things really become the most important things when they stack up on top of each other. Understanding that those little, those 0.2 pounds becomes another 0.2. And now it's a building block for another 0.2, and now it's a building block for another 0.2. And now all of a sudden "I have some intrinsic motivation going. Now that train is in full blown and it can't be stopped. It's important to just slow down and, and, and celebrate the small things. You know. Now, obviously in a little bit more of the, the business world, my eyes are on, you know, bigger. How do we get bigger? How do "I find more contracts? How do we get more people to be interested in mandu? Uh, how do we open up more studios? But at the same time, I need to make sure that "I continue to center myself and, and think at a studio level or at an individual client level. How are we. A client's life from, from Monday to Friday, or from January to March, or from March to April. And, and what small changes have been made along the way that we need to celebrate? and that, you know, that dives into really being service, service so oriented and, and the way that we are starting to look at things. And, the big picture growth that, that "I like, that "I would like to see more studios, more contracts, more, you know, mandu blowing up across the country. Really comes from the fact of that person that started with us that has been unable to lose weight regardless of what he or she has done. And they've now found a way to lose 0.2, lose 0.2, lose 0.2. Well now all of a sudden that same client has gone and told, you know, 6, 7, 8 people that, Hey, "I haven't been able to do this in the fast "I found this company. It's called Mandu. I'm finally doing it. so for us, it goes back to how do we simplify. To its most basic principle because that is where you're gonna see client growth. cuz the more a client feels like we're in this with them together, or the more a student feels like a teacher is in it with them together, or a coach is on the same page and we're in this together, uh, the more they're gonna be willing to give to that entity. And, and, you know, whether it's education, whether it's a, a sport team, or it's a boutique fitness facility in, in Chicagoland. It all kind of comes back to that ability to feel like we're all part of the same process. And when we have a client that, that is able to show progress and they know that we continuously care, now they go tell seven, seven new people that all of a sudden show up in a, into a Mandu facility. Now my big overarching goal of, you know, more contracts, more studios, is kind of in place, but it didn't start from think. About all those studios and all those contracts. It started by doing the smallest pieces of that.

Luke:

You know the one big thing that "I fall, "I should say, "I stumble upon more and more being a high school teacher, a high school coach. And "I know you used to be in the industry. Now you're in the industry of adults is a word you brought up earlier and that is grit and "I think it's just such an important word. obviously Angela Duckworth's book is a phenomenal read. For any of our listeners who have not read that yet, I'll put that in a show notes. That's phenomenal. Um, can you teach Grit Taylor or do just some people have it and others.

Tayler:

You could teach it Grit can be taught. Um, You know, "I, "I, don't know if grit can be defined in, in, in a different way to look at it. "I don't know if grit can be defined, but grit can be taught. Um, and "I know as an English teacher, you're sitting there going on the other side of the mic. Well, that makes no sense. Uh, and, and "I, "I, you know, in a lot of ways it doesn't, it doesn't make any sense. Um, Grit to me is, is the, the day in and day out. It's the boring stuff. It's the stuff that nobody sees. It's the stuff behind the scenes. It's the stuff that, uh, allows the entire entity to move forward without everybody, anybody ever even noticing that it happened. Um, and "I think when you look at high school football, which you and "I share probably most in common between our, our, our lives. Grit to me is what happens in the weight room. It's what happens in the classroom. You know, everybody sees the product that's on the football field and everybody wants to talk about the product and the wins and losses and what happens on the football field. But the concept and the idea of grit, especially as it pertains to high school athletics, it's all the stuff that happens outside. it's the way that you practice, it's the way that you go to the weight room. It's the way that you communicate with your teammates. and. Do "I think it can be learned? Yes. Can "I, can it be taught in a lesson form? No, In, in a singular sit down classroom lesson? No. "I don't think grit can be taught like that. Grit can be observed. Grit can be learned. grit to me is something that. Isn't necessarily definable like "I, like "I started this with, but it's something that as, as you see it and as you watch it happen, as you see a, a team come together, as you see a classroom come together, and any of us that have spent time in, in a classroom or on an athletic field or in a gym, have seen that process of grit paying off and all of a sudden everybody's goals begin to align. And now all of a sudden coaching becomes really easy. you know, you just become the, the moderator, the cheerleader, the guy that is helping to mold everything else, or the girl that's trying to help mold everything else. But the, the team, because of the grit that they've. In and out of the weight room, in and out of practice facilities, in and out of the classroom. They're what begins to drive this whole thing, and, and that's, that's where coaching becomes really, really exciting.

Luke:

And really regardless of what you're doing at Mandu or what I'm doing in hallways, it's still just coaching and teaching. But there has to be some differences that you have observed from working with teenagers to now working with adults. What are those differences that really stick out to you?

Tayler:

Man, "I, tell you what, that's the "I. That's the, probably the, the biggest conversation my wife and "I have had over the last three years is what's the difference between what you're doing now at Mandu and what you did in the classroom? there's less of a difference than you would think. Uh, And "I and "I "I, I've had the pleasure to teach in a couple of different educational settings, whether it be, you know, more affluent area versus a, a little bit more of impoverished area. and "I continuously said throughout my time teaching that kids are kids. It didn't matter where "I was at. Kids are kids. that actually holds true Now in the fitness world, you know, students, clients are students or clients just we're, we're calling 'em different things. In the education world, it's students, it's athletes. Now to me it's clients. My clients now, just like students and athletes, they want structure, they want plan, they wanna be treated like people. Uh, they wanna be happy, they wanna receive a great experience and a phenomenal service. and that, that is why "I say that there is not that big of a difference. Now, "I will say, you know, "I taught high school PE for a long time, and "I and "I Middle school, PE. "I had a handful of of students throughout my time that didn't really wanna be there. They didn't wanna dress, they didn't wanna participate. difference now is that my clients pay me to come in and do what they're doing. Uh, so there, there's a, there's a bit of a

Luke:

a big difference.

Tayler:

So as you add, you know, as you add that financial piece to it, there's a little bit more motivation behind the clients that are coming in now to our, you know, gym facility versus, the students that were coming in to a gym facility in the. but ultimately whether it was a student in my classroom, whether it was an athlete on one of my teams, whether it's an athlete on one of my son's teams that I'm currently coaching, or a client inside of our Mandu studios, You know, they want feel connection. They want a good relationship. Uh, they want an experience and they want to be treated properly. And, and again, that goes back to that second part of that, that motto that will get you here. B five, you know, treat people how you wanna be treated, and "I. Think if you can continue to remember those things, whether you're a teacher coach. You know, entrepreneur, ceo, whatever, whatever your title might be. You treat people like people and, and you show respect, and you wanna make sure that you're delivering a great experience, whether you're trying to get somebody where to, you know, to learn where to place a comma, or you'd like to see somebody lose, you know, 0.1% body fat, uh, or you're, playing for a, a Super Bowl in the nfl. people just want to be treated like.

Luke:

I'll tell you, "I always know the way to my heart tailored thrown in the where to place the comma "I. Know that was for my sake. So, so thank you cuz. "I think me and maybe three other people in the world actually care where a comma goes. But, uh, but it is important nonetheless. So, yeah, "I mean we touched upon a personal philosophy of yours, which is that people service and happiness really make the difference. So although your day to day may be a little bit different regardless of when you were a teacher and now you are a, uh, you know, you're in the personal fitness real. Your philosophy has not changed. We've talked about the people we've talked about service. Where does happiness play a role in making the difference?

Tayler:

Yeah. "I, um, this starts maybe more from my, my staff perspective. I'm gonna start with here and, and. Everyone needs to be happy to be great at what they're doing. if you're not happy with what you're doing, it's gonna be really hard to find yourself being great at it. so, you know, "I as "I deal with staff now as "I dealt with coaches and, and, coworkers, teachers that "I worked with in the past, you know, "I, "I dealt with some, let's say less, less than happy people throughout my career. What I've noticed is that happy people usually are very efficient workers. and that has now held over into, into this business world. And, um, you know, when my staff's happy, they seem to work a lot harder, uh, when clients are happy with service. They seem to talk about mandu a lot more. Uh, so "I "I think that the, the idea of happiness really becomes that, that driving motivator to continue to, find the next thing that makes you happy. And, um, you could string along a bunch of happy days. You're gonna live a, a real happy life.

Luke:

So need to be happy to be great at what you're doing. "I "I wrote that. For those of you following me on Twitter, you're gonna see that one out there, "I. Love it. Maybe I'll give Taylor credit for it. Not really sure. "I may steal that one. So really then what we're saying, think about the realm of motivating them motivated. What I'm hearing from you is if we could find those touchpoints that help make our students, our athletes, our clients happier. That may also help to motivate them to keep pursuing that vision that we constantly lay out in front of them. What do you think?

Tayler:

"I would. Sure. "I would sure think so. Um, you, you wouldn't get a rebuttal from that on me. "I. "I think that that happiness is, is one of those greatest motivators that there is. So, um, "I know that question was a lot earlier here in this, in this. Conversation, but you know, maybe that, maybe that would've, maybe that should have and should have been. The answer to that is, you know, happiness, find a way to make everybody happy, which is, which is a hard, hard line to push. You know, "I, think about trying to make everybody happy. You're not gonna make a decision that's gonna make everyone happy every single time, but how do we drive people towards. Things that are gonna make them a little happier. And "I and yeah, "I "I, wholeheartedly believe that if you can string together some happy days, it's gonna lead, to a happy life. So,

Luke:

Yeah, so this is a tough part with team sports because inevitably there's going to be a lot of unhappy people. When it comes to playing time, there's going to be more people sitting on the bench than out on the field. Now, there's exceptions to that, but generally speaking, in most sports, there's more people on the bench than out there actually playing. So how do you keep, again, if, if you have the answer to this, we need to box it up and sell it. How do you keep those people happy? And motivated, because that is a constant struggle that I'm faced with because "I feel like athletes just, they give up and they immediately turn into the victim and stop trying to keep pursuing it. Right? So some ideas of how to keep those backups happy and.

Tayler:

Man, "I, "I. I'm gonna credit this to you "I. Think on this one. You know, we spent a couple years coaching together, but, the happiest "I ever seen kids is when we kept everybody as involved in absolutely everything as we possibly could. And, uh, You know, like "I said in the beginning of that, I'm gonna credit that back to you, "I, before, before coaching with you, "I didn't, do that. that wasn't a goal. It was, you know, how do we get the best kids on the field and how do we figure out a way to win football games and people are gonna be happy if we're winning football games? and the reality is, is that kids, especially high school kids, "I mean think about the, the, the amount of stress and, and drama and everything else that happens in a 15 to 18 year old kid's life every day. They're gonna be happiest when they feel like they are actually a part of the bigger picture. so in, in the football world and, and "I think it translates pretty well to basketball or lacrosse or soccer or whatever, whatever your avenue of athletics is. You gotta keep kids involved as much as possible. And, and they need to know from a very, very young age that they're a part of the bigger entity. They're a part of the bigger picture. You know, on a Friday night, you only get 22 starting spots. Um, at least that's what, that's what the general public consensus thinks. There's 22 starting spots on a football field. In reality, there's six special teams units that go into that too, on football. So there's, in my mind, there's 88 starting spots. You know, you'd be hard pressed nowadays to find too many varsity rosters that got 88 kids on it. so you want to, you want to keep a kid happy, and that's a very football specific model, but you got 88 starting spots. Find a way to get every kid on the football field at some point, and you're gonna see a lot more smiles than, than you typically would on a football field or on a.

Luke:

appreciate the call out there. "I. Mean "I. Guess "I. Set that one up for you to, to gimme a little shout out to it. But yeah, you know, seriously, you know, you think about "I. Think it was, uh, Yeah, actually "I know. It was Herm Edwards, that famous quote of, You play to win the game. Right? And there's a lot of validity to that. But "I also try to think about from the realm of you joined the sport to play the game, right? So no one joins the sport to watch other people play the game, and that's the constant struggle. And you talk about the specialization piece that we hear so much in sports today. "I do think it's worse than it's ever been. There are many layers that contribute to. "I do think that's part of it though. Kids are going, "I don't, I'm not gonna watch somebody else play. And we've become so wrapped up in the wins that sometimes we forget about the people and the more we go back to the people, which again you said, people, service and happiness make the difference. People make the difference. So the more that we keep it a people business, then "I think the happier we'll be as leaders. And "I. Our kids, our clients, whoever we are in charge of will be happier as well. But then how do we keep the external happy Taylor, or do we just ignore that and not worry about it?

Tayler:

Oh, that's a hard thing to do as a coach. "I "I will say one of the hardest, and, I, I'd be lying if that wasn't a piece of why, why "I wasn't still involved in the coaching and educational world. "I think it became a little bit too much of that at least, at least for me. but, You gotta worry about what you can worry about. And "I think, and all the head coaches that are out here listening to this, that's something you do have to worry about. Uh, if you're an assistant coach, you know, if you're just a part of a program, if you're helping, if you're a volunteer coach, you can control the kids and you can, you can help To lead, lead the kids, control the kids is the wrong way to put that, lead the kids into the direction that, you know, we're trying to get to. parents aren't there. Monday through Thursday, parents aren't there. Saturday morning practice, parents aren't there in the weight room at 5:00 AM when we're working and trying to get all those things in. So yes, every parent up in that stand is gonna have an opinion and every parent is gonna fight for their kid, um, in my opinion, as they should. Um, but it also becomes important for. The team culture and the processes that are going on that there, there is some kind of a, a groundwork laid of this is, this is the way that we do things. And, I think that there's at least. 75 to 80% of these parents that actually do understand that, you know, there's, there's always, there's always a couple that, you know, there's outside noise, there's, um, you know, my kid should be doing this or, You know, well in sixth grade my son was this and you know, well he got caught or he got passed and you know, some of those things are hard for parents to hear and hard to see. But "I think as, as coaches, as leaders, uh, it's our job to be very honest and sometimes brutally honest. Uh, and where things stand and "I "I do think that does fall into what you were saying, the specialization and you know, parents pulling their kids out of things if they feel. They're not the best here. Maybe they'll be the best over here and something else. but hopefully you've gotten your teeth into, and, you know, you've developed a program philosophy that it's something where that kid wants to be every day. You know, it's a must, It's a must have experience, for that kid to show up at practice every day. Because whether I'm playing on Friday night or not, I gotta be a part of this thing. There's, there's something special about the way we do things. There's something special about. the chemistry, the atmosphere that's been created, and it's a must have experience regardless of what it looks like on Friday.

Luke:

Love it. Absolutely agree about the experience because regardless of playing, We're still creating experiences as leaders that could be very positive, influential, and stay with someone throughout your life. And that's really what should be the goal. And I'm sure that's the goal of many listeners, which is why they're tuned into the podcast because they're like-minded like us. So to bring us to a close, we touched upon the model again, plus one B five. We didn't talk about really that plus one part of the B five. So we wanna talk about that in your model.

Tayler:

Sure. So this is, uh, something that "I developed more so "I guess in, in the, uh, since "I since leaving education and, and looking at. How to lead trainers, how to lead managers, how to lead franchisees in developing, you know, business models and operational models. And, um, you know, actually something "I I've stolen from my father-in-law, who has spent most of his life in the, business franchisee world, Um, and plus one, plus one truly stands for go the extra mile. Go the extra mile, whether it be. an interaction we have with a, with a client within our facility, or, you know, an interaction we have with somebody walking up and down the sidewalk. when "I talk about plus one and "I, my, my trainers probably get sick every time. "I walk out or into a studio, Hey, what do we do to plus one today? And things like that. but plus one, the idea behind it is continuously going the extra mile. You know, whether it be. Going the extra mile inside of our studio setting, picking up a, a piece of trash that blew out on the sidewalk in front of our store. Um, two of our studios are inside of shopping centers with, uh, big grocery stores. Whether it's walking around and pushing some of the carts back down where they're supposed to be. You know, taking care of your community, doing everything you can to make sure that you are, you are, plus wanting what you did yesterday. You know, one of the thing, "I, think this kind of. Turned into two different models for me. One of the things that "I always used to hear in the coaching world is, you know, as you're finishing sprints, as you're finishing drills, finish plus one finish past the line finish. You know, "I think, uh, "I, to be honest, "I think it was a college, a college coach of mine that continuously used to say, plus one. Plus one. You know, if it's a 10 yard sprint, you should be going 11. always plus one. So I've taken a little bit of that. The ideas of my father-in-law's companies and going the extra mile, and it's kind of transformed itself into that plus one mentality. Figure out a way to go get one more contract today. Figure out a way to go help one more client. Be better at what they're doing today. "I. Figure out a way to put the, the, the best workout together to, to exceed client's expectations and, and deliver that, that must have experience so that they go back out and tell five more people about the experience that they had at Mandu. and that's kind of transformed them to. Plus one B five and just continuing to remember everything that you've learned as a kindergartner, because that's gonna continue to, to hold true regardless of what stage of life you're in, regardless of where you're at. whether it be education, coaching, business, you know, if, if you remember all those things that you remember, you know, don't hit your neighbor. Say sorry. Say thank you. Own up to what you've done. You remember what it's like to be a kindergartner? celebrate those small wins. so it's kind of transformed itself into plus one B five.

Luke:

Love it. Plus one B five. And if we've motivated a listener that wants to learn a little bit more about Mandu and maybe enter into one of these, fitness boutique. What's the website? Where's the best place they can learn?

Tayler:

Yeah, so the best place to find us is@mandu.com. It's m a N D uu.com, uh, that that'll show you all of our locations nationwide. and then you could, reach out my, my emails directly on the website as well. So I'm director of operations for, all of Mandu and then own and operate the studios here in Chicagoland. And then, my Twitter handle is at mandu Taylor. you can find me there.

Luke:

All right. Awesome. Well, "I have no doubt that, you provided a plus one for our listeners and you've helped make me, and you've helped make our listeners better people, hopefully more motivated to go out to go attack our own personal fitness goals. And, despite, or "I should say, rather, no matter if it was the high school kids or the adults you're working with now, "I have no doubt you are changing people's lives for the better. So thanks for being on the show today and, uh, look forward to continuing to discuss the joys of being a now youth coach of seven, eight, and nine year olds on the football field. So thanks for being on the show today, Taylor.

Tayler:

Thanks for having me, Luke.

Tayler Erbach Profile Photo

Tayler Erbach

Director of Operations

I spent 10 years in the education and coaching world. Once I started having my own kids it was time for me to find an avenue that allowed me to focus on them a little more. I have now made the transition from teaching kids in a PE setting about the importance of physical fitness to helping adults achieve their own personal fitness goals. Manduu is a personal fitness boutique fitness concept that uses electrical muscle stimulation to enhance the amount of muscle breakdown in a shorter amount of time. Nationally, there are 16 locations now up and running (3 in the Chicago area). Although my day-to-day work is very different than it was in the education world, my philosophies have remained the same. People, service, and happiness make the difference. A motto I have slowly learned to commit to is #+1be5. The significance of this is that as long as you remember to go the extra mile and closely monitor everything you learned when you were 5 there will always be a path to success.