New Episodes Released Every Tuesday!
July 19, 2022

Humble Confidence w/Sarah Teipel

Humble Confidence w/Sarah Teipel

#49. Today we are joined by Sarah Teipel, who is the new Head Girls Basketball Coach at Mundelein High School in IL.  Coach Teipel spent the previous 9 years as head coach at Dundee-Crown (Carpentersville, IL), winning 2 conference championships, 4 regional championships, a sectional title in 2020 & was twice named Coach of the Year.

In this episode, we are going to discuss:

  • Building relationships, 
  • Establishing standards, 
  • Focusing on daily improvement, and 
  • How teams with a strong culture providing positive life experiences can help provide wins both on the court and in life.

To sign up for weekly notes from each episode, CLICK HERE.

Review The "I" in Win on Apple Podcast or my website to let me know what you think of the show.  Follow me on Twitter (@LukeMertens)

Transcript

Luke:

This is episode 49 of The "I" in Win podcast

Sarah:

I just think being a humble leader is key as well. you know, I'm knowledgeable in my craft and I, but I constantly am telling my players that the minute I stop learning as a coach and a teacher is the minute I should stop doing it.

Luke:

What's up everyone. I'm Luke Mertens host of The "I" in Win podcast. The podcast that showcases coaches who focus on the process over results and believe in coaching people and not just athletes. Today, we are joined by Sarah Teipel, who is the new head girls basketball coach at Mundelein high school in Illinois. Coach Teipel spent the previous nine years as head coach at Dundee crown, which is also in Illinois winning two conference championships, four regional championships, a sectional title in 2020, and was twice named coach of the year. In this episode, we're gonna discuss building relationships, establishing standards, focusing on daily improvement and how teams with a strong culture providing positive life experiences can help provide wins both on the court and in life. Coach. Thanks for joining us today.

Sarah:

Yeah, thanks a lot for having me.

Luke:

Let's start with coming back to Mundelein high school. That is your Alma mater. What's it mean to you to be back there in a head coaching role?

Sarah:

Yeah, I mean, pretty special. Uh, it was felt pretty surreal when it, when it happened. I mean, when I, you know, obviously I grew up in Moneyline lived there most of my life, played sports. There, went to school there. So. Having the opportunity to return, um, always had a piece of my heart, uh, in Monday line and always felt like I bleed the Mustangs. And I said that to them when I got that job back. Um, so, well, not back, but I did the reason I said that is I did go back for a few years, right after I graduated from Western, and helped coach, um, and was an assistant to who coached me in high school of Brian Evans. so returning yeah. Is nothing but excitement, was. Truly a special summer just being back in the building.

Luke:

And you're taking over a program that has struggled a little bit recently. So you mentioned to me, you're gonna be focusing on building relationships with your players. How do you plan to do that? Or how have you been doing that throughout this summer?

Sarah:

Yeah, I think, uh, and you've been a coach. You would agree that, you know, it can't be forced. I think it's important. To start to build a foundation that you're just very authentic. they can tell right away what you represent as a person. So, day one of starting camp, I had a parent meeting and a player meeting at the same time and brought 'em in the gym and told them a little bit about myself and things I represent. And, you know, I think bringing that energy that I have as a coach, cuz I love the game of basketball and showing that investment in each one of them on day one. I really tried to get their names down, in that first week, which was difficult, but trying to learn like just one or two things about them that first couple days to where they could tell just that I was present and that I really cared about building that relationship. And then, you know, after that, you continued to build through the summer. So we did end up going to a team camp. Um, we had an opportunity to take him to the university of South Carolina team camp. so that really helped. Kind of solidify some of that team bonding, um, and deepen the relationships.

Luke:

So two things that you mentioned, I want to go back to. One was you had that parent meeting. beyond just that parent meeting. Are you doing anything else to foster that relationship? Because head coaches have different philosophies. Some head coaches believe to keep parents at arm's length, distance. Other head coaches believe that, Hey, this is a relationship that we're gonna work together on with fostering these kids and bring them into adulthood. So what are you doing to build that relationship with your parents?

Sarah:

I mean, yeah, at the, parent meeting, I talked about a pyramid of having coach parent and player all aligned. and that's something I learned when I went to a coaching clinic a long time ago, but, That I wanna be transparent to them that they know that what I represent and that I think a key to leadership is open communication. you know, I want them to understand what I'm gonna be like as a head coach and that I'm not afraid to talk to them if, if they have a question or a concern, um, I'd like to sit down with them so that we can make sure we're on the same page. you know, I think, you know, as a head coach, obviously you have boundaries and. It's important to establish that, uh, with parents, but, um, I think they could see with me meeting with them and being vocal about, you know, kind of what I represent and what I want with our communication. They understood, you know, kind of moving forward, what it would be like.

Luke:

Another thing you said is you wanted to get their names down that first week. And that really resonated with me. That's really important to me. Why is getting their name down quickly important to you as a head coach?

Sarah:

Well, I just, I'm a teacher, you know, first and I feel like it means something to, to students and, to anyone when you can call them by name. so when I could name them each and. During a drill. I just felt like it was a different personal moment between myself and the player. So we were starting to get a little closer. I could, you know, now name them by name and then, um, you know, throughout camp, just to expand upon that, we did things like to have a little fun. We did theme days. so they could, you know, maybe dress it a Hawaiian shirt right before camp started. And then, you know, we'd take a quick picture, but it was just a way to just be a little loose before we started. But, you know, just some little conversations, pulling players aside each day, helped, you know, foster that relationship in those first few weeks.

Luke:

Yeah. Getting to know a player's name. I think a lot of coaches, I think assistant coaches in particular, sometimes under value, how important that really is to know someone's name. So I know I talk to my staff about it all the time. I want you to get every kid's name down. There's nothing that makes me cringe more than I hear. One of my coaches say, Hey, you, you, you number 52, come on over here. Because that just blows up everything I say that we're gonna be about as a program to kids, cuz if we're gonna be about people and relationships. That's not building relationships. So, uh, we're on the same page with that. The other thing we're on the same page with is program standards and you're coming as a new coach and you have to establish those. So how do you establish your program standards? Do you have daily meetings, weekly meetings? Does it just happen organically in practice? How are you making sure that your athletes know this is what our basketball program is going to be?

Sarah:

Yeah. I mean, I brought that day one, at the beginning we circle up and talked about the controllables. So two of the standards that we really wanted to maintain every single day and revisit, which we stressed a hundred, 10% effort. So given a little bit more. and attitude. Um, so bringing that energetic, positive attitude every day and, you know, just sharing that I have that passion and I had that as a player and I still have that as a coach and like giving my transparency with them, showed my investment. I think that was key. And then giving examples, like on a daily basis of what that looks like. So what does it look like to give 110 in a drill? Like, let me give you a quick example and. After camp got done, re circling up and having the players name a couple examples. How a player demonstrated a hundred, 10% effort today, or how did we show some toughness? And as we went through the standards, which we would talk about different things every day, um, and I did try to involve them in, in making the standards as well. told them to go home and think about some things they thought were important. and they brought that back with them. but I think, yeah, just it's important to be consistent with your values. So every single day we talked about the controllables and it's something that we revisited. And even if we hit a bump in the road during camp, Hey, we circle up for a second. We talk about, Hey, we we're gonna keep the bar here 110%. So that just was not good enough. So, that's kind of how we've.

Luke:

Another standard that you believe in is daily improvement. How do you track that? How do you make that tangible? I know, I believe in that, I'm sure a lot of our coaches listening believe in that, but I personally have struggled with making that real and tangible for athletes. So what do you do to make that real form?

Sarah:

Yeah. And I don't think I've always been the best with that cuz uh, and I'm glad you touched on that, cuz it's easy to say, like let's get 1% better every day, but yeah, it's sometimes hard to be measurable with that. Um, So it's something that I do believe in, Hey, you can get 1% better every day. So I think just being measurable and goal, always having a purpose behind a drill, um, or something that you're doing with the team. So at times I had my assistant track, some things and stats, some little things, um, some defensive goals that we had, And then we were able to talk about that. So, Hey, today we got a little bit better on our helpline and if you saw, Hey, Audrey got two deflections because she sprinted on the flight of the ball, you know, or, Hey, we, cut off the baseline. We had a foot on the baseline on our closeout. So we got three staff, you know, little examples of, and very like specific with what led to that, improvement, defensively as a. so we did that when we went to the team camp too, we, I had my, uh, assistant track, some of the defensive goals we had. And I think that's just how you make sure that you are being intentional with that improvement.

Luke:

Well having done this before, there's gonna be some roadblocks along the way. As you are building this program to the standards, you want it to. What are some of the roadblocks that you are anticipating and how do you plan to stay positive despite the valleys that are gonna be coming your

Sarah:

you know, I think when I took over the job at Dundee crown nine years ago, One of the initial struggles we had was numbers. they had had some low numbers and that's something that I've been seeing a little bit at Monday line this summer with the timeframe of getting hired. so I think it's just keeping a positive attitude and understanding what it's gonna take to build. it takes time. Um, it takes a lot of investment and heart and passion and surrounding yourself with other great people that can help you build. and at Dundee, crown, what helped me was. 110 full investment as a coach. And then, like I said, surrounding myself with a great staff that I could delegate some things to, but I think, what ended up drawing more kids into that program. And we ended up improving a lot of our numbers and I'm envisioning the same thing to happen at Moneyline was, one just seeing that it was an enjoyable experience. Girls talked to other girls, they were really enjoying themselves in the program and. yeah, there was high expectations, but they saw the purpose and the why behind them. some of the roadblocks were when you do raise the bar, it can deter some people. so I did end up losing a couple players when I made some much higher expectations. but in the long run, it really paid off. because then you brought that consistent person in the program that knew what was expected.

Luke:

I think I know what you're gonna say, but I I'm gonna ask it anyway. So you raised the standard. Players may not want to meet the standard. We all know that they can, it's a decision if they want to put in the work to get to your standard. Have you always been okay with, even though she may be a starter for you just looking at the long vision and saying, this is a loss right now, but long term, this is better for my program. Like how do you handle those difficult things? Because you're right. You need time to build it, but in today's world, coach, let's be honest. We don't get a lot of time, even at the high school level, people expect winning right away. So how do you create that balance of, yes, I do need time to build it. Yes. I have a standard, but man, this girl's really good and could help me win and winning will help attract more players to the program.

Sarah:

Yeah, I, I mean, I've had situations in the past where, struggled with maybe a talented player, but, um, maybe not. Best attitude at the beginning. and I think it's just important that you don't compromise integrity. Um, that's something that is big with me. So I think you've gotta keep everyone to a high standard. So even if that player's talented at the beginning and, they have to meet the expectations that you have in the program. And, so I feel like yeah, you don't have any time you give players time and you work with them. Cuz I've worked with plenty of players that have a lot of, maybe some weaknesses that they struggle with or maybe a little attitude at the beginning. but I think if you just stay persistent with them and give 'em a little time, then a lot of times they'll find their way. but I also have had those players that just can't meet the expectation and they haven't been able to stay in a program.

Luke:

So one really important thing in terms of being a head coach taking over program is getting players to believe in you any thoughts on how you're gonna do that at monoline or how you did it in the past at Dundee?

Sarah:

I think just through sharing experiences with them too, as you know, I was an athlete and I've been in their shoes. so sharing some of my experiences with them, I think helps them understand that. I've been there and I know what it takes and just sharing some of my success stories with, as a player too. and I don't, I just think being a humble leader is key as well. you know, I'm knowledgeable in my craft and I, but I constantly am telling my players that the minute I stop learning as a coach and a teacher is the minute I should stop doing it. so showing them that humbleness as a leader too, I think helps them build trust.

Luke:

What about player to player? What do you do to help the players to trust each other basketball like football sport? I coach is a team game. You have to trust that the other people on the court are doing, they are coached to do, and that's, that's difficult to do. And I feel like, I mean, I, I don't coach basketball. This is a really big general statement about athletes in today's world. I fight they're calling more and more individualized and we're losing that trust. So what are you doing to coach trust?

Sarah:

Yeah, I think trust is a huge one. I think, you know, building relationships. So I'm gonna give you like a little example when we went up to South Carolina. my coach. And I laughed because the first team pick, we took, everyone was standing next to each other like this. Uh, and we did it before and after frame with them and it was hilarious, but I said, you know, could put your arms around each other, you know, you don't have to be so awkward. And it really came down and it showed me though that they just, the comfort level wasn't there yet. because I do have a lot of young players, and some players that haven't played with each other. So I think just providing those opportunities. That they can let their walls down a little bit and feel comfortable. So on a trip like that and doing little fun things like going out for ice cream, but going to this team camp and playing games together while we were at the house, and kind of being loose with it at the beginning where they get a little more comfortable with each other, kind of breeds the ability to take a steps forward with that. something that I do a little bit deeper in the season that I've done is, uh, breaking down the walls activity where I have the girls talk. In front of each other, who their best friends are right now on the team, if they have any and then who they need to build relationships with, and then a goal of what they're gonna do in the next three weeks to build that relationship with those teammates and then we've revisited it. and then kind of talk about how the importance of that trust factor is and why we do that. but I think like another key thing is in basketball. Yeah. I always talk about like, how are you making your team better and to get girls to understand that, like you should find value in the fact that you made the person next to you better. And that's sometimes hard, for girls to understand, and it should feel just as good for you. If you had an assist as a three pointer, should feel just as good as, um, on the bench as if you're on the floor. And that's also you doing the right thing with making sure every player feels valuable on that team and feels like they're, you know, part of the one unit.

Luke:

let's talk about breaking on the walls. I really like that. Do you ha do the girls get up in front of the whole team? I think you said. And do they say it to the team and Hey, I need to know Sarah A. Little bit better and they just kind of announce it and here's my plan to get to know her better.

Sarah:

Yep. Yeah. So they'll just say, hi, my name is, Sarah Tyle, my best friends right now, my closest friends on this team. So, and so, and so, and so, and I have had teams that have just said, one, one player, you know, and then they'll name like nine others that they need to build relationships with. And a learning lesson from that activity too, is like, you know, one time after three weeks, I was like, okay, so what did you do? And one of 'em was like, well, we, we have a streak on Snapchat. I'm like, okay. So you literally just send a selfie together to each other every single day. And they said, yes. And I said, well, That's a star, but I want you to be a little bit more detail I was like, what? You know, like you're just sending a picture to each other,

Luke:

Yeah. That's communicating in their world.

Sarah:

I know, so I, you know, I made me laugh a little bit, but now I, you know, say, Hey, listen, just getting a streak is not enough. You know, I want you to learn something about that person. and we can bring it back to the group. So we always kind of revisit that and then. Hopefully the end goal is that we all know something about everyone. And I always talk about like, I've played with players that you don't, you know, you have differences from, you might not be best friends with them, but we all have to feel like we can love each other. And when we step on this court, we share the same thing and we care about each other. So, that's kind of how that breaking down the walls activity worked.

Luke:

Yeah. That's, that's really interesting cuz I know I've been thinking about that in my own program. I'm not, I know who likes each other, but I do not know who does not like each other. And I feel like as a head coach coming in, that's important for me to know because. We do have to break down those walls and establish that release. The only way we're gonna be able to function on the field is trusting the person next to you because you may be playing next to your. To your enemy. You may not like this person, but you have to be able to be a teammate within that two and a half hour timeframe of practice or a game. So that is really intriguing to me. I worry about I coach, I mentioned football. I worry about teenage boys being able to take that seriously enough. I, I really like it, but so, in your experiences, have the girls followed through. With the relationship piece or did you have to keep saying, what are you doing to become closer to

Sarah:

no. Yeah. I definitely had to revisit several times. When I had some players for several years, when I had that group that ended up going to the super sectionals, they really understood that, because I had been with them since the fifth grade for feeder. but then there's been some newer groups that I haven't even had as deep relationships with. And so. I've had to revisit that activity like several, several times. and then there's been a couple times where it was like a true bump in the road. I had players not do it, you know, didn't really put any effort into it and didn't see the value. So, um, something we had to go back to, but, it's definitely something that I think, and I think it's beneficial for boys and girls, but, you know, I think you would agree with this boys or girls, sometimes people can compete and then build a relationship. What I've seen is you need, you know, to build that bond and that trust. And then they'll go through walls.

Luke:

Totally agree. And I feel like the harder they work in practice together, the quicker those walls will come down. That's just my opinion. I think the ones that if you're gonna have off season workouts, the ones that show up and sweat together on the court, that's where those walls come down. I feel like the divide happens when someone isn't as committ. Versus someone who is committed. And I feel like that really creates that divide. And that's something that, you know, if I could, if I had a magic wand to fix, I would love to fix that one, but really, it just comes down to, Hey, you wanna be tighter as a team one, you have to invest a same amount of time. And that is commitment in the off season. But that's also like what you said, go hang out together, right? Like do something on your own. It needs to happen beyond just when I am telling you. To hang out and that's where those walls are gonna start to come down. But I have a feeling you learned a lot of these things from your days as a division one, athlete yourself, played basketball at Western Illinois. What are some of those things that you carried from your athletic experience that you have with you on the forefront as a coach right now? And you use.

Sarah:

a lot of things, uh, yeah. I had the privilege and opportunity to play, um, at Western and learned a lot with my experiences there, um, just understanding roles, like I think, uh, you know, I came in as a freshman and I talk about how everyone's got a different role. And I had, you know, I've shared this with players. Like, you know, I used to, I was used to playing all the time and, you know, I had. I was on the bench my freshman year. And I had to really, truly earn that spot. And it was a competition every single day. And, just little standards that I represent now are things that I learned in college that translated, but I also had a really good high school coach that kind of helped me outline that. but just the discipline, you know, the hard work, the commitment, playing a college sport. It is like your life. but I've carried a lot of those high standards that I learned there into my high school program. because I think that there's not that much difference if you wanna be great in high school, um, you gotta practice the same habits. so yeah, I mean, one of my strongest years was probably the fresh, my freshman year. We had a six seven center, from Laia and had the, an opportunity to win the Midcon that year. And we beat Wisconsin that year and, and ended up going to the nit and played at U of I, so. Sharing some of those success stories to the girls too, I think helps. just that I can tell them, Hey, I've, I've tasted a championship myself and I, I do know what it takes. So trust me, cuz I, I will help you get there.

Luke:

So one thing I have seen having some division one football players on my staff. So they're assistant coaches. is because they played at such an elite level. Sometimes they struggled that the player just couldn't do what they were asking him to do. So I would explain to this coach, like, although this was maybe doable or easy for you, remember you were a division one athlete. This kid is a backup on a high school team. So it's not that he doesn't want to do. He just is unable to do that. Have you found given the fact that you were a D one athlete that sometimes you do struggle a little bit between if a kid is actually trying versus what they actually can and can't do.

Sarah:

Yeah, I, um, you know, I think that's something I've learned as a coach, to be very realistic. You know, you have such high expectations. And I think it was taught to me at a young age is, and it was from my high school coach that, you know, the kids are never gonna want it as much as you do. And it's something you're gonna have to accept. And it's definitely something that I've learned through my years of coaching. You know, you always just want them to feel exactly how you feel. And when I was younger, I definitely feel like I sometimes maybe had unrealistic expectations for my players. But I do think it's something that I've continued to get better at. Um, as I've gone through the teaching and coaching world, I think it's important to not lower the bar. because that's how you really push those kids past their comfort zone is raising it, but also being realistic with what each one of them can, can achieve, is an important.

Luke:

One thing you said to me that I really liked was you can have a losing record, but still be a winning team. And you've also had wins that have not been worthy of excellence as well. Can you explain those comments?

Sarah:

Yeah, I think something I've always really emphasized with my teams. When we win, we wanna feel like we played basketball in the right way as a team. And it took care of the win. We didn't emphasize the win. We took, you know, we took care of the process that, that, that brought us there. So, you know, always stressing that greatness and what it looks like on the basketball court as a team. so I think in that winning culture, so when I had a losing team, my first year at Dundee, crown, We just stressed what a winner looks like every single day. So what a winner winner mentality is like, what it, what it has to, to walk on a court and feel like you're a winner, what it should look like and how we should practice like a winner. and I feel like this summer with Moneyline, we faced some tough competition in our summer league and, uh, a lot of the girls had been used to losing. Um, and it was tough cuz I could tell. We weren't fighting in the, the full game. We were, you know, playing some of these tough teams and they'd give a lot more fight and I was seeing a change, but then when they started to get beat on, you know, it was like they were rehashing the old, like remembering. and it was a pivotal moment cuz we did, I did talk to them. We can lose against these teams, but we're still a winning team. And that's what you have to think about. You are a winner, you know, You can get 'em to smile with it. Like it's a way you carry yourself. And I just would emphasize that all summer. And then it was awesome. We played this team prospect, at the end of the summer, and they had beat lost by 40 in the region, all the last game of their season LA the last time. And we lost by 20, at the beginning of the summer league 20 plus. And we ended up beating them by the end of the summer league. Um, and it really came down to. Outright hustle and hard work. It wasn't a ton of, you know, fancy things that took talent on that basketball court. So it was a pivotal teaching moment just looking at 'em and saying like, you prove to yourselves what it took to win. Like that's what it should feel like. And it was, they were super excited and, and it was less about the win. I said, it's less about the win it's about how it made you feel, cuz you played like a team and in the right way.

Luke:

And what does a winner look like? I understand what you mentioned about how winners practice that part. I understand, but as someone who's taken over a program myself, that. Needs to refine themselves and understand what winners look like. How would you explain to teams or to your athletes? This is what a winner looks like. What do you want them to envision?

Sarah:

Yeah. I think someone that just brings an attitude of hungriness every single day that wants to get better. someone that has the bar high for themself, someone that has good drive, so that passion inside, a winner is someone that buys into team. Um, so I think there's a lot of things, but it's a way they carry themselves so confidence and I talk about, it's not cockiness, it's a humble confidence. That, when you step on that court, you're gonna win the drill. And I always tell 'em an expression. You can't guard me and you can't beat me. And that, that shouldn't be a cocky thing that you're gonna say that like, uh, you know, you can't guard me. You can't beat me, but that should be a mentality in your head that no matter who you face, they're not gonna guard you and they can't beat you. And that's that confidence piece that you have to start believing in yourself.

Luke:

And how important is it? I really like what you said about, you had a game you lost by 20 and you're, you know, you're literally pointing at your team saying you guys are winners. How important is that? And does it reach a point where. It just becomes white noise to 'em and they stop believing. And then.

Sarah:

Yeah. I mean, after we lost, cuz we lost the first three weeks, of summer league, you know, I was feeling even my cuz I could tell they were sick of losing, you know, they needed a win just to build some confidence. And I mean, I think all you can do as a coach is show your continued continual confidence, you know, and belief in them. Um, when we lost, I remember it was before the week and we were getting better though. It was a lot better through the weeks. And so I would talk about the small successes through the loss. They have to understand that part of the process is gonna be continuous failure. And right now we're just failing through it, but we're taking steps forward. And I think it was just reassuring them that like, we are going to figure this out. Like I promise this is part of the process and you've gotta trust me on it. And you gotta trust each other cuz we are figuring this out together. So just that reassurance that you have the belief in them and that no matter whether it be a loss or a win or a bad loss, we're gonna figure this out and we're gonna keep pushing forward.

Luke:

And in addition to the process over the result, you also focus on the experience and making sure that athletes understand it. This is much larger. Then basketball. So how do you do that? And how do you make sure the players understand that what you're doing as a coach is much larger than basketball.

Sarah:

I think it's important to plan. A lot of team events. so one, like I said, you can build relationships, but then you just build memories and have some fun with the, with the team. I think it's funny because I think you would probably, you know, you'd meet some athletes that when they visit back, they talk about maybe a championship, but then I've had a lot of athletes like come back and they remember the bus rides where, you know, so, so and so fell off the seat and they were, you know, rapping this song or something. when you give these girls opportunities for experiences and new memories, um, that's just things that they hold with them. So, you know, with each other forever. And, I think, basketball in every sport provides a, a, a big avenue for life lessons. and you know, I take my job really seriously, even though I do balance it with fun and in a lot of, a lot of positive, but. You gotta make that experience rewarding and memorable for them. So I think I just do the best I, I can, as my coach and with, delegating some with my assistant coaches with trying to plan some things that make this experience really memorable and enjoyable.

Luke:

of my last questions. The concept of, I take my job very seriously, cuz I do as well. And I think most head coaches in any sport and high school level do even the junior high level, they do. We, we take pride in what we're doing. We're competitive people. What do you do when maybe you start becoming too serious about it? And maybe you start losing side of the fact of it's starting to become too much about winning basketball games and not enough about process, not enough about the experience. What do you do to kind of check yourself as a head coach when you start to feel yourself slipping into that, that abyss.

Sarah:

Yeah, I think that's huge. I mean, I think it's just important to be reflective. you know, there's times as a head coach, I've been like, gosh, maybe I, I was too hard tonight, you know, maybe that was just too hard. and I think it's like just that constant growth, like you getting them to understand too, that, you know, you're constantly growing as a coach too. And I think acknowledging that, for example, when I thought I went too hard on my team, one night, you. Given a lot of positive affirmation and acknowledging that I, I know I went really hard on them that night, you know, last night, you know, and I think, yeah, you just check yourself, like you said, you know, we're not perfect. Uh, we make mistakes and, you know, I think it's important to stay confident in front of your team, but you know, it's an important part of your growth as a head coach that you're constantly reflecting on things you can get better with and, making sure you're doing what you need to do to make this experience memorable and enjoyable for.

Luke:

And what are some great resources you could share with our audience? Most of whom are teachers or coaches, are there other, podcast books that you would recommend? Any clinics, anything that you would recommend that have really helped you or continue to make you a better coach today?

Sarah:

Yeah. I mean, I, I just did a PGC, basketball clinic. I've done the I B C a basketball clinics. I read this past, uh, year with one of my teams, the raise your game book by Ellen Stein. Um, that breaks up a team, a player, and a coach. And we went through and highlighted some things and went through that during the season. Um, I've read some John Gordon books, like the energy bus. Um, and we talk about that. Like, you know, being an energy giver, not being an energy sucker, like someone can change the, the whole room vibe, the minute they walk in, if they bring in the energy. Um, those are two, two books that come to mind right now. Um, I'm big on quotes. I love John wooden. Um, I've read some of his books and, but yeah, I mean, I'll end with, yeah. I just think surrounding yourself with, with people that can help you grow and learn. That's something that I value. So any clinic I see that I can hop on, I, I love to do that. And, new books, I'm, I'm always open to, for someone to recommend a new one. If you have any.

Luke:

Well, I love quotes too. Do you have a favorite quote?

Sarah:

Um, gosh, I have so many, um,

Luke:

Well, I'm really happy.

Sarah:

think I like,

Luke:

MJ behind you, which makes me

Sarah:

oh yeah,

Luke:

happy. I mean the best athlete of all time, in my opinion. So.

Sarah:

yep. Um, gosh, I mean, oh, there's so many quotes here. Uh,

Luke:

Yeah, I'm putting you on the

Sarah:

Excellence is not a singular act, but like a, a habit that you repeatedly do and who you are. So, that's one of my favorites, hard week hard work, beat talent when talent doesn't work hard. that's one of my favorites just cuz I, I feel like I've had the opportunity to coach some great teams, but didn't have any D one athletes yet, but had. True winners that just put the commitment and the hard work in, and it beat talent a lot of times. cuz they just knew what it took. So those are 2, 2, 1, 2 ones. I really like.

Luke:

I love him. Thanks for sharing that. And thanks for being so generous with your time. Sorry. Put you on the spot with that one, but I, I love quotes myself, so thanks. Thanks for

Sarah:

no. Yeah. Oh yeah. And I love MJ. you know, the, some wish it would happen, you know, others make it happen.

Luke:

Yeah.

Sarah:

J one. Yep.

Luke:

Well, as soon as the video popped on, I saw MJ behind you. I'm like, this is, this is my type of coach we're in. We're good. So you would've lost me a little bit with, uh, some of the other players that will people make arguments are better than MJ. I have that argument all the time with these current high schoolers. They just don't understand, but I guess you're, you're a victim of your time, right? I'm sure. I'm sure my grandparents were laughing at me when I said Michael, Jordan's the greatest of all time, right? I mean, That's that's the way it goes, but thank you so much for coming on. I wish you a lot of luck as you rebuild the monoline monoline Mustangs. I'm sure you're gonna do a great job. Look forward to following your success and to our listeners, I will have Sarah's contact information, uh, in the show notes. So feel free to reach out to her, reach out to her on Twitter or email or however you'd like to connect. So with that coach, thanks for coming on and best of luck, this school.

Sarah:

Yeah, thanks so much for having me on coach. and best of luck to you at St. Pat's.

Sarah Teipel Profile Photo

Sarah Teipel

Varsity Girls Basketball Coach Mundelein High School

I love basketball, and having the opportunity to teach and coach it is one of the most rewarding professions out there. I played basketball at Western Illinois University when pursuing my undergraduate degree, and after pursuing a masters degree after graduation, I began my career as a high school wellness teacher and head varsity girls basketball coach. I have been a head varsity coach for 9 years, and coaching at the HS level for a total of 14 years. Over my 9 years as a head coach at Dundee-Crown, our teams had 2 conference championships, 4 regional championships, and a sectional championship in 2020. I just began a new head coaching and teaching position at my alma mater Mundelein High School, and am very excited for this next chapter of life!